Cosmopolitian magazine dating

But while the Cosmopolitan title on the cover remained at a typeface of eight-four points, over time span the typeface of the Hearst's International decreased to thirty-six points and then to a barely legible twelve points.

After Hearst died in 1951, the Hearst's International disappeared from the magazine cover altogether in April 1952.

In June 1914 it was shortened to Hearst's and was ultimately titled Hearst's International in May 1922.

In order to spare serious cutbacks at San Simeon, Hearst merged the magazine Hearst's International with Cosmopolitan effective March 1925.

Enjoying sex without shame was also a message she incorporated in both publications.

In Brown's early years as editor, the magazine received heavy criticism.

Reeve, with 82 stories featuring Craig Kennedy, the "scientific detective".

There was also a department for the younger members of the family." Under John Brisben Walker's ownership, E. Walker, formerly with Harper's Monthly, took over as the new editor, introducing colour illustrations, serials and book reviews. In 1897, Cosmopolitan announced plans for a free correspondence school: "No charge of any kind will be made to the student.

In 1905, William Randolph Hearst purchased the magazine for US0,000 (equivalent to ,154,000 in 2018) and brought in journalist Charles Edward Russell, who contributed a series of investigative articles, including "The Growth of Caste in America" (March 1907), A. Cronin, Alfred Henry Lewis, Bruno Lessing, Sinclair Lewis, O. Mc Intyre, David Graham Phillips, George Bernard Shaw, Upton Sinclair, and Ida Tarbell.

Jack London's novella, "The Red One", was published in the October 1918 issue), and a constant presence from 1910–18 was Arthur B.

It became a leading market for fiction, featuring such authors as Annie Besant, Ambrose Bierce, Willa Cather, Theodore Dreiser, Rudyard Kipling, Jack London, Edith Wharton, and H. All expenses for the present will be borne by the Cosmopolitan. Wells' The War of the Worlds was serialized, as was his The First Men in the Moon (1900).

No conditions, except a pledge of a given number of hours of study." When 20,000 immediately signed up, Walker could not fund the school and students were then asked to contribute 20 dollars a year. Olive Schreiner contributed a lengthy two-part article about the Boer War in the September issues of 1900.

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